Spring Blossoms

Sunday, November 1, 2009

While cleaning out my pantry yesterday, I came across my old bread machine.  I have't made bread in quite awhile.

Today, while checking on my blogs I  opened Tipnuts.com and the first thing I saw was 12 Homemade Bread Recipes. If you are thinking about making bread, go there for your recipe.  I am going to make the  Decadent Sweet Milk Bread  I'll let you know how it turns out.  I can't wait.


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LUCILLE'S FAVORITE REFRIGERATOR ROLLS


2 cups milk

1/4 cup shortening

5 Tbls. sugar

                                                                   
1 cake yeast

5 to 6 cups of flour

1/2 tsp. soda

1 tsp. baking powder

1 egg

1 Tbls. salt

■Scald milk. Add shortening and sugar. When mixture is lukewarm, add yeast and dissolve. (If dry yeast is used, dissolve it in one-fourth cup warm water and reduce milk to one and three-fourths cups.) Add soda and baking powder sifted with three cups flour. Beat until bubbles come. Allow to rise one-half hour.

■Beat egg and salt until light and add to the sponge. Add remaining flour to make a soft dough. (The less flour you use, the lighter the rolls and doughnuts.) Knead until smooth. Place in greased bowl, grease the top, and place in refrigerator.

FOR ROLLS

■Divide dough into three parts. Roll each part into a circle about nine inches in diameter and spread each circle with melted butter. Cut each circle into 16 wedge-shaped pieces. Roll each piece beginning at the wide end. Place on greased baking sheet. Allow to rise for one and one-half hours, then bake 20 minutes in a 400 degree oven.

FOR DOUGHNUTS

■If all the dough is to be used for doughnuts, three-fourths cups of sugar may be used instead of the five tablespoons called for. If the original recipe is used, an extra thick layer of granulated sugar for coating finished doughnuts makes them sweet enough.

■Roll dough that has been refrigerated to one-fourth inch thickness on floured board. Cut with floured doughnut cutter. Allow to rise one and one-half hours. Then fry in fat heated to 370 degrees. If you don’t have a thermometer, test by dropping a cube of bread in the fat. Fat is hot enough if bread browns in one minute.

Source: Kitchen-Klatter Magazine, April 1952

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